Mosman Festival of Sculpture – The Judges Comments

Mosman Festival of Sculpture – The Judges Comments

Visual Arts Coordinator – Alison Clark – Willoughby City Council. 2nd Prize was awarded to Karl Van Middeldyk for his work “Unlocking the Links”. This beautifully balanced and resolved work which challenges our perceptions of scale and possibilities, constructed of sandstone with refined interlocking links it appears fluid, almost weightless. It is a symbolically rich work which engages the viewer on multiple levels. You can read the full story by following the links below… Mosman_Featival_of_Sculptures_1...

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1st Prize Winner

Port Stephens Examiner – 12 May 2010, by Jessica Brown Garden Sculptures Released IMAGES of a small forest and an enormous banksia have taken out first prize in the Hunter Region Botanic Gardens sculpture competition. Karl Van Middeldyk from Sydney won the outdoor sculpture section with his work titled Life After a Fire. The sculpture weighs 1.2 tonnes and depicts a banksia flower coming to life after being ravaged by fire. Garden chairman Jan Noble said the sculpture was made from sandstone rescued from a demolition site and had prominent convict markings around its base. Darrell Tickner from Newcastle won the indoor competition with his Forest sculpture. Both winners took home $1000 in prize money and all 42 entries in the competition will be on display in the gardens till June 20. “We were very pleased with the competition and hope to run it again next year if the council continues its support,” she said. Trevor Lewin’s Tongue Tied sculpture of a frog carved from native timber received a highly commended award along with Angela Callaghan’s carved sculpture. BY JESSICA BROWN – Port Stephens...

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Karl carves his way to second place

Karl carves his way to second place

Karl van Middeldyk, a stonemason from Arcadia has come second in the Mosman Festival of Sculpture, with “Unlocking the Links”, a finely crafted work depicting a linked chain and padlock. The work, which resulted from a challenge “to see what he could come up with” while sitting around one day at work, is an inspired symbolic tribute to the research done into genetic research by the teams of Dr Chris Semsarian at RPA Hospital into sudden unexplained death syndrome, which has touched Karl’s family. Created over a marathon weekend to match a challenge from his sister Zoe, who was simultaneously competing in a triathlon, the work will ultimately be donated for auction. “Links” will raise funds when multi-coorporate businesses generously outbid eachother for a great cause. On exhibition until the auction, Karl’s great hope is also to be specially selected to exhibit at the sSculpture by The Sea later this year with another sculpture not yet finished. “A heaps bigger special piece I’m shutting up about!”. You will also recognise Karl’s work in the wonderful Hippo, featured at the Fit Kidz playground last month. He is set to become on of the legendary artists and craftsmaen that are becoming a hallmark of the hills rural area community. see his work www.aussiestonemasons.com.au Here is a PDF of the original...

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Hippo Comes To Dural – Rural Times

Hippo Comes To Dural – Rural Times

Rural Times Newspaper – April 2010 Fit Kidz Dural welcomes an 18 tonne carved Hippopotamus (carved by Karl Van Middeldyk – Aussie Stonemasons) to their wonderful enviro-playspace. This Hippo took many hours to carve and is a beautiful feature of the 1 acre play space. The dynamic and engaging outdoor space will provide children with an incredibly rich environment in which to play and learn. Apart from the major “feature elements” like the bike track, the farmyard with huge growing beds, the water play in the massive sandpit, the basket swing, wet/dry creek and the outdoor “tee-pee”. Hippo at Dural Rural...

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Life and death set in stone

Mosman Daily – March 20 2010,  by Kate Crawford A STONEMASON, who dedicated his sculpture to his 19-year-old brother who died suddenly, was one of the winners of the Mosman Festival of Sculpture. Karl Van Middeldyk, 33, had never had a sculpture exhibited publicly before but that didn’t stop the judge describing his stone work as “a beautifully balanced and resolved work. The sculpture won second prize in the festival. First prize went to established sculptor Blaze Krstanoski-Blazeski for his bronze sculpture described as “powerful and dynamic. Krstanoski-Blazeski, from Botany, has had his work chosen five times for Sculpture by the Sea. Judge and visual arts co-ordinator Alison Clark announced the winners at the festival open day at Mosman High on Saturday. Van Middeldyk said he was hoping to raise awareness for sudden death in adults. In 2006 his brother Heath, who was the youngest of five children, died from what is believed to have been a genetic disorder causing sudden cardiac arrest. “It devastated my family big time, Van Middeldyk said. “Heath was just starting an apprenticeship, just starting his life. Van Middeldyk said the chains and keyless padlock in his stone sculpture symbolised the challenge for researchers to unlock the causes of sudden death. The sculpture Unlocking the Links is at Harvey World Travel in Mosman and is for sale for $7000 with proceeds to go to research.   by KATE CRAWFORD – Read the original story from the Mosman Daily.  Here is a PDF of the...

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Local Stonemason claims prize for Centenary Institute

Local Stonemason claims prize for Centenary Institute

Centenary Institute – Research for Life This past month, Centenary Institute supporter Karl van Middeldyk claimed second place at the Mosman Festival of Sculpture for his sandstone carving entitled Unlocking the Links. The sculpture is a tribute to the life-saving research on genetic heart disease being done at the Centenary Institute’s Agnes Ginges Centre for Molecular Cardiology. In 2006 van Middeldyk’s 19-year-old brother Heath died from what scientists believe to have been a genetic disorder causing sudden cardiac arrest. Each week as many as ten young Australians die suddenly from a genetic heart disease. Before 1990 very little was known about gene faults which cause heart disease. Research conducted by Professor Chris Semsarian and the Molecular Cardiology group at the Centenary have helped to shed light on this terrible disease. Today, scientists have identified more than 40 genetic defects that can cause sudden death. But there is still a lot of work to be done in putting end to sudden death. The chains and keyless lock represented in van Middeldyk’s sculpture symbolize the challenge for researchers to unlock the causes of sudden death. van Middeldyk generously donated his prize winnings and the sculpture to the Centenary Institute. The stonemason said he hoped that the gift would “create a ripple effect of giving, inspiring people to give as they are able to help others.” Executive Director Professor Mathew Vadas says, We are delighted to receive such a meaningful piece of artwork. We have proudly displayed this work of art at our reception where researchers and visitors alike can be inspired by its evocative symbolism. The piece speaks to the work we do at Centenary and to the goals we want to achieve in combating the world’s most devastating diseases.” Read the and Original story here at the Centenary Institute website. Donate to the Centenary...

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